Spritz, Speed how you Read

Read faster

 colleges and careers become increasingly competitive, it is even more of a necessity to not only proficiently be able to read, but to be able to do so quickly. A recent new app, titled Spritz, guarantees to improve this vital skill, using technology to change the face of communication and comprehension as we know it. It isn’t currently in app stores, but the creators are working diligently to make it available.

The app works by breaking portions of text into individual words and flashing them one at a time on screen in a frame called the ‘redicle’. The ‘spritz speed’ refers to how fast the words pop up on the screen for you to read before it disappears and flashes to a new word. The available spritz speeds are 250wpm, 300wpm, 350wpm, 400wpm, and so on, up to about 1000 words per minute. With spritz, it is even possible to read over 900 words per minute. The science behind it is that the factor that makes reading take so long is that the eye has to travel from word to word across the page. This is eliminated with spritz.

It is currently capable of comprehending emails and text messages. The developers hope to one day expand to social media, closed captioning, and digital books. The idea is that spritz will speed up time used to read these, allowing you to spend less time on technology devices and more time in the real world. Sophomore Alyssia Arjun agrees that, ‘I spend a lot of time on my phone and I understand that text messages can be distracting. The app could help me spend less time on my phone.”

 

This app could help Patriot students as well as students everywhere. Speeding up reading time will help during standardized testing so students spend less time reading and more time answering questions. Junior, Ciera Houston, was not previously aware of the app. “The concept sounds pretty cool. It seems like it would be assisted in helping me read faster so I can be more proficient when taking tests, like the SAT.”

 

Upon hearing about this breakthrough in the advancement of reading, people, including some of our own Patriots, questioned if when using spritz would you actually remember and comprehend what you read. Spritz addresses this frequently asked question on their website saying, “Of course… Our testing shows that the retention levels when spritzing are at least as good as with traditional reading and that, with just a little bit of experience, you will retain even more than you did before.” (http://www.spritzinc.com/). Also, according to their website, spritz assists in helping dyslexic people and those with ADD to focus and better comprehend when reading. All in all, this app appears promising, and has educational perks. It proves that technology is constantly upgrading to keep up with the modern day student.